Our New Blogs

Not sure if we have any subscribers anymore, since we haven’t written in forever! But I thought I’d let any of you out there know that both Lorax and I have continued to blog since the PCT…just not on this site since it was pretty PCT specific.

Check out Lorax’s blog at intocascadia.com – trip reports, gear reviews, and general environmental goodness. He is the Lorax after all!!

I just started my very own blog at intobohemia.ca (see how we have matching names?!) – trip reports, spiritual musings, and basically journalling. Why a new blog now? Well, we are making a major transition at the end of October, and I figured I had best document it.

Here’s a hint…

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Peace, love, and adventure,

Lorax and T-Fox

PS – Having a glorious ride in this gem of a van may have had something to do with things…I’d say it’s safe to say I was feeling the nomadic, hippie vibes back then in SoCal 🙂

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PCT Video Part 5 – Washington!

Hands down, Washington was my (T-Fox’s) favourite terrain on the entire trail. Don’t get me wrong…she threw some challenges at us – grown-over trails in section K and cold, bone-chilling rains just to name a few. But she made up for it with her beauty and her character.

Washington felt like home. Canada was so close. As hard as wet-weather can be, we enjoy West Coast weather because rainforests are magical…the wilderness is ALIVE with lush and green vibrancy.

And I relaxed more than I ever had on the trail. Sure, we were cranking out long, gruelling days, but I felt so capable to do so! And Canada was SO CLOSE! With only 510 miles left in Washington (with 2150 miles completed), we had this thing. If I could go back, I would…in a heart-beat.

The entire PCT was unreal…better than I ever could have imagined. I’m not just saying that in a naive “those were the days” kind of way, but in an honest-to-God kind of way. THE BEST experience of my life to date. It’s hard not to feel a little depressed when I think back to the PCT. Here I am, sitting on my couch, watching videos from the best adventure/trip of my life. I was strong! I was outside everyday! I was LOVING life! How do you get that feeling back? How can I continue to make everyday like the PCT?

Sadly…I don’t think I can make everyday an adventure. Life goes on. Work has to be done. I say I would hike the PCT again in a heart-beat…but would it be the same? Should I keep reminiscing about those days and wish to live it all over again, or embrace today for the challenges, and wonders that she has for me? While hiking on the PCT, I kept reminding myself to “live in the moment” and soak it all in. I need to keep doing that. Live in the moment, even if the moment is going out for drinks with a new friend or walking my dog around a lake. Those moments can be just as beautiful and magical if I allow them to be.

It’s been roughly 10 months since we started the PCT. We’re in Victoria, settled into our jobs, and thriving as a couple. We try to explore The Great Outdoors as much as possible – camping, mountain biking, hiking, and skiing. Mother Nature is EVERYWHERE!

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Backcountry skiing smiles!

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Lorax hitting it…

Cheetah Giant in Pacific Rim National Park, BC

Cheetah Giant in Pacific Rim National Park, BC

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So while we may not be walking on the PCT anymore (boo-hoo), we are still trying to embrace the lessons on love, life, and adventure that we learned through that experience. Recently, we visited the Cheewhat Giant here on Vancouver Island – the largest known red cedar in the world. I cried when I met him/her. Started bawling like a baby. I feel more in-tune with nature…with life…with the complexity and FRAILTY of it all. You have to respect life that is thousands of years old…right?

Walk On,

T-Fox and Lorax

Sporting our PCT metals :)

Sporting our PCT metals 🙂

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PCT Video Part 4 – Oregon!

Gloriously gracious Oregon!! – The land of flatness, “unending” trees, and tolerable weather.

She did not disappoint. If anything, I’d have to say that Oregon was much better than either of us expected. I mean, check out this video…the trail was more than trees! Crater Lake, lava flows, mountain views and waterfalls surrounded by LUSH foliage.

These were the days where the “easier” terrain (combined with our strengthened bodies) allowed for more ambitious mileage. My confidence had rocketed by this point…T-Fox is capable! I can’t quite say that I was feeling like I had this thing “in-the-bag,” but I was feeling stinkin’ close.

So here’s the section of the PCT through all of Oregon, in a very tiny nutshell. Of course, if you really want to know what she’s like, you may just want to give it a go yourself 🙂

Walk on,

T-Fox

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PCT Video Part 3 – Northern California!

Well, Dan has compiled the next video – Northern California. We both keep watching it over and over and over again…reliving the wonder, the laughs, the views, and the quality time with each other and with nature.

We miss the trail terribly…but it’s nice to remember something so fondly and with such a full heart. The PCT is a new friend, and she will forever be our friend.

But we do miss her 🙂

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PCT Video Part 2: Central California!

Re-living the Sierra days with Part 2 of our video series!

Here’s where the trail got serious…steep mountain grade climbs, spectacular scenery, and strengthened bodies. This video literally brings a tear to my eye.

Those were the days! That was living! An adventure we will never forget.

Still walking on…

Lorax and T-Fox

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PCT Pt. 1 – SoCal

Lorax has added our first PCT video! We will be releasing four parts to our unforgettable journey, so stay tuned for more…eventually.

Walk On,

Lorax and T-Fox

 

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Thank you!

 

Finally reunited with Sitka!

Finally reunited with Sitka!

I came to our blog today with the intention of thanking everyone for their congratulatory comments on the blog, and in some cases, in person. Both Dan and I (or is he forever Lorax?) had no idea that so many people were following our journey and supporting us through thought and prayer. It nearly brings me to tears when I consider it.

I am currently visiting family in southern Ontario, while Dan (last I heard) is camping in the woods somewhere in Victoria British Columbia while attending school and searching for an apartment for us. My man continues to look after me, even while I’m away – maybe I should have been Princess Fox 🙂

My task for the day is to load up our lives in a 5 x 8 foot trailer and drive it all back to British Columbia for the next chapter in our journey – luckily my parents are helping with the move!

Adjusting back to life as been interesting but comfortable with the help of family and friends. I’m not sure if it has truly sunk in that we are done walking…almost like this is an extended break.

So thank you everyone for your kind words of encouragement during our trip, and your celebratory congrats over the past week. I miss my trail, but she’s not going anywhere…

Momma Fox with her grand doggies

Momma Fox with her grand doggies

 

 

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Where the Trail Ends (T-Fox)

September 4 – 2641 to 2660 (19 miles)
September 5 – 2660 to 2669 (9 miles)

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September 4 – 19 miles

This morning is like no other morning on the trail. Unlike all the other mornings, we don’t check the elevation charts and maps and plan our day. Our day is simple. Walk 19 miles to Canada. Don’t rush…don’t plan…just walk.

There’s a lightness in my heart like no other…I’m going to do this thing! No more “maybes” and “probably’s” and “man, I sure hope so’s.” Just a definite, sweet, glorious FOR SURE. No doubt about it Lorax! We’re gonna finish this “never-ending” hike, and we’re gonna do it today.

We are so laid back, that we ignore our alarm in the morning and sleep for another hour. The day is perfect – dare I say the most perfect day yet? Blue skies, amazing conversation, a chill hiking speed, no hurry, and even an extended lunch.

We lounge in the sun atop the last big ascent, eating our tuna wraps and cookies. Lorax comments on all the distant mountains…Canadian mountains. Home.

After lunch, the trail descends a few hundred feet, just to come right back onto the ridge we are standing on. There’s an alternate trail that has been closed because it is impassable, and it loses less elevation by traversing along the shale bowl of the ridge. One guidebook describes the route as only necessary if you want to die on your last day on the PCT. Sounds fun.

Lorax begs me to allow him to do it. It only saves a mile, but he’s drawn to it “just for fun.” I know my man well, and I know that he has a higher than average sense of adventure. While I’m just happy to hike the well managed trails, he likes more of a challenge, and the PCT has not really presented much challenge for him. So…what’s the harm…?

He starts his sketchy traverse, while I begin my long switch-backing descent into the valley. He promises me that if the trail gets ridiculous he will turn back and join me. I lose sight of him early on, and assume he got across early, but as I approach the beginning of my climb, I spot him walking along the loosest shale, with no trail whatsoever. It turns out the trail literally drops off into a shale field with no way across but down. He looks like he is managing well though, so I keep climbing. At the top he tells me that he wouldn’t need to do that again, but if he hadn’t, he’d always wonder “what if.” No harm done.

The afternoon is surreal. Did we seriously walk all the way to Canada? Is that even possible? Who does that anyway?! I am honestly in disbelief. What an accomplishment. What an adventure. What a character builder!

As we get within a few miles of the Northern Terminus, I get butterflies in my stomach – the same nervous feeling I had standing at the Southern Terminus at the Mexican border. It’s weird really, that one would feel nervous upon ending a hike. I have to pee more than usual (nervous energy!), and find myself getting a lot quieter. Lorax is his usual, chipper self, cracking jokes and keeping the mood light. I feel so heavy though…so introverted and somber. I’m excited and happy too…just feeling a lot of confusion over my emotions. This is a good thing to be ending….right?

We see the strip of cut trees that mark the border line – it’s so close! I beginning to run, and let out a nervous squeal. Running to the monument. Running to the end. I want it so baldly all of a sudden that walking seems inappropriate.

And there she is, in all her glory: The Northern Terminus, looking nearly identical to her southern counterpart. I drop my hiking poles on the ground and throw my hands to my face…tears welling in my eyes. “Wow,” is all I can say. Lorax takes a good look at the monument, and comes over for a great, big, celebratory hug.

“We did it T-Fox. We’re thru-hikers.”

We did make it. We ARE thru-hikers! Despite the numerous announcements of my quitting, and against several odds (as roughly 30% of hikers make it), we did it. The moment is like no other moment we have ever experienced, and we’re not likely to feel it again. We have stepped from a hopeful thru-hiker to a thru-hiker: all 2660 miles done in one continuous hike. We feel proud…and lucky that everything worked out.

We take several pictures at the monument, faces beaming with joy. WHAT A FEELING!

Lorax cracks open a mini bottle of champagne that he carried out from our last town stop in Stehekin. He sets the camera up for a picture, and the iPad to video mode. He times everything just right, giving the bottle a good shake, and releases the spray…all over me!! I let out a stunned scream just as the camera clicks, and we are left with the best monument picture of all time (in our biased view of course).

After signing the register, we reluctantly leave the monument, as two other hikers, Tim and Scott, are there as well and we want to give them some space to soak it in. We are in Canada…our home sweet home. We walk the 0.2 miles to camp, holding hands, all smiles. What a great moment to share with one’s spouse, partner, and best friend.

The evening grows cold, and Lorax builds a campfire. We invite Tim and Scott over, and the four of us talk about the trail for hours. We eat our final camp dinners…nothing fancy, but oh so familiar and comfortable. We retire to our tent, feeling awfully at peace.

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The hydro cut that marks the border!

The hydro cut that marks the border!

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September 5 – 9 miles

Sleep until seven. Toss around in my warm down sleeping bag, savouring her comfort and security.

Time to get up. While we have completed our thru-hike from Mexico to Canada, there are still 9 more miles to “civilization” that is Manning Park BC. They are not technically PCT miles, but they are part of this hike.

We’re happy today. I savour the last uphill climbs, feeling the burn in my chiseled calves and thighs. We talk of how we will maintain our bodies in the near future, but also how nothing will ever compare to walking all the time. The conversation even turns to future thru-hikes that we may want to do. Maybe the CDT that follows the same border to border idea, but does so through the Rocky Mountains. And then maybe the Great Divide Trail, Canada’s extension of the CDT. Maybe. Just maybe.

And then…the trail ends. It literally JUST STOPS. No more.

We stand there, looking back at the trail that we have called home for so long, and ahead at the paved road that leads to the rest of our lives. I feel so sad! It’s so final. So abrupt. But I guess there’s no easy way to rip away the best experience in one’s life.

We eat lunch where the trail ends, sharing a Corona (for Mexico, of course!) and try to keep things light, while both of our hearts are sinking.

We hike to the lodge, have showers, do laundry, and sit in deliciously comfortable couches.

“You don’t have to walk tomorrow T-Fox.” Wow. That’s so strange.

We hitch to the campground, which is 4 km away, and wait for our friends to arrive. Kyle, Mere, Ryan, and Barb all made the long drive to Manning Park, just to celebrate with us! Our BC friends! We feel so special, and very appreciative of their support. They arrive just after dark, and hoot and holler out their windows upon seeing us sitting at the picnic table. There are plenty of hugs going around, and Kyle quickly gets to cooking us the most delicious vegetable curry rice meal EVER. We all wear party hats…like children. Man I love my friends.

It’s the perfect ending to a perfect adventure. It feels good to be among familiar, loving faces…to transition back to society with the help of some really great folks. I’m not sure if they realize how helpful they were in reminding me that there is ALWAYS great people in my life – that I don’t need to hike the PCT forever to feel connected to something that matters. The PCT is incredible, but so is my life and the constants within my life – great friends and family, who love and support me.

And who didn’t think I would make it. 🙂

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At the end of the trail

At the end of the trail

Our welcome gang!

Our welcome gang!

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So Close I Can Taste It… (T-Fox)

September 1 – 2580 to 2599 (19 miles)
September 2 – 2599 to 2620 (21 miles)
September 3 – 2620 to 2641 (21 miles)

His pride and joy

His pride and joy

September 1 – 19 miles

We hit the Stehekin bakery HARD on our final morning in town – sticky buns (#3 for me, #5 for Lorax), bagels, a loaf of bread, a scone, and two cinnamon buns. It’s beyond ridiculous, but the food is that good, and this is our last chance to overload on sugary carbs!

We take the first bus back to the trail, and as usual, our packs are heavy. I struggle my way up the gradual incline…so much so that Lorax offers to take some of my load. I’m frustrated that I am so much weaker than him, but I can’t pass up the offer. Man I love that guy.

The day consisted of lengthy conversations about finishing the trail soon. This is the last haul, and we’ve decided to slow down our mileage a bit.

It feels like fall today, and it’s hard to believe we started this whole thing in late April. Time has FLOWN by.

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September 2 -21 miles

We start the day off with crossing Rainy Pass – the last “real” road crossing on the PCT. And just moments later, we are greeted with the 2600 mile marker…only 60 miles to go!!

The thick morning fog sticks around, and it gets increasingly cold. I find myself hiking in my thick down jacket…something I haven’t had to do all trip.

Cue the rain – a good solidly COLD Washington rain. I just knew Washington wouldn’t let us off that easy! I can’t imagine hiking through here in October…brrr it’s cold!!! We walk in solitude today, too confined by our hats and jackets and hoods to have a decent conversation.

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Unreal...

Unreal…

At least someone was enjoying the rain...

At least someone was enjoying the rain…

September 3 – 21 miles

That was a cold night! We wake, feeling far from rested, and far from stoked to hike in the persistent rain.

Today I came to terms that I am READY for this to be DONE. Even if rain doesn’t last forever, it’s still difficult to stay engaged and positive in our hike when it just keeps falling, and we get more and more soaked. We’re sad to be wrapping this up, but we are also getting a taste of Washington fall weather, and we are not interested in getting much more! As we ascend up Harts Pass, the rain turns to snow. SNOW. I was not impressed. Don’t get me wrong, I love a little snow to ski on…but not to hike in…in September.

No views today – just fog, fog, fog. Oh Washington, you can be so glum sometimes. Cheer up!

Finally, while we set up camp, the clouds break, and Lorax announces blue skies. I skeptically look up, expected a tiny blue patch just teasing us, but he’s right – completely blue skies! Not a cloud in sight!

We camp with a crew of volunteers who are surveying the wolverine population in the area. They quiz us on our hike, and we find it hard to put our experiences into words. Sometimes it just feels like a “you had to be there” kind of trip. We love talking about it, but we feel like we are always just scratching the surface when we describe things.

Tomorrow we cross the Canadian border. We lay in our den, cozy in our sleeping bags, cuddled in each other’s arms, reminiscing on the trip, laughing, and reflecting. I wouldn’t have wanted to share it with anyone other than you Hun.

Cold start to the day

Cold start to the day

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Team Canada...going for the long haul!

Team Canada…going for the long haul!

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Sneakin’ into Stehekin (Lorax)

August 26 – 2476 to 2490 (14 miles)
August 27 – 2490 to 2516 (26 miles)
August 28 – 2516 to 2540 (24 miles)
August 29 – 2540 to 2568 with old PCT shortcut (23 miles)
August 30 – 2568 to 2580 (12 miles)
August 31 – ZERO in Stehekin
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Aug 26 – 14 miles (LORAX)

We awake, rested yet sore as always at the Cascadia Inn in Skykomish, WA. Today isn’t going to be a zero after all, as another hiker reminded us that Monday is Labour Day, which means the Stehekin post office will be closed with our food drop. We decide to hike the 104 miles of the supposedly arduous Section K in 4 days to arrive before the P.O. closes on Saturday.

We hitch 16 miles back to the trail at noon in the back of a pickup. We cram into the bed of the truck with a large dog kennel, packs on one side and hikers on the other. I quickly realize my hat is in serious jeopardy. The dog kennel separates me from my hat, which is bouncing around the other side of the truck in the 60 mph winds. After a few tense minutes it safely lodges between the side of the truck bed and a propane tank, much to the relief of T-Fox.

At 1pm we start walking, fresh tomatoes in hand courtesy of our chauffeur. We climb out of Steven’s Pass towards a camp spot at Grizzly Peak. At 7pm we arrive, set up camp and make dinner. Tonight’s meal is pesto spaghetti – a trail favourite made with whole wheat spaghetti, dry pesto sauce packets, a foil pouch of tuna, milk powder and lots of Parmesan and olive oil. Parmesan is a wonderful trail food that seemingly never goes bad and always tastes good. We’ve got a full pound of it for Washington.

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August 27 – 26 miles (LORAX)

We awoke to “super-dew” which we saw coming but couldn’t easily avoid. We wear rain pants for the morning as we walk through alpine and sub-alpine vegetation of blue lupine, corn lily, red columbine, cow parsnip and Indian paintbrush. The terrain in Washington has been spectacular lately and we’re excited to be entering the Glacier Peak Wilderness.

At mid morning we pass a trail side “2500” monument constructed of bark. It’s pretty nuts. We’re at a cool point in the journey now where the bulk of the work is behind us and we’re mentally free to enjoy the walk with less obligation. 160 miles left seems like nothing. The end is tangible and we’ve got mixed feelings about it. It’ll be a relief to be done walking and we’re looking forward to next chapter of our lives, but living outside has been great and we love Washington. Thankfully these areas are close to home, so the walk feels more like reconnaissance for future adventures.

Late in the morning we hear scrambling and look up to see a large mustelid climbing on the bark of a Douglas Fir. Is it a Marten? Fisher? The cat sized animal awkwardly leaps back and forth between tree trunks with its stubby legs, while regularly stopping to peer and huff. It’s one of neatest wildlife encounters of the trip, second only to the grey fox in SoCal. We later learn all the Fishers have been trapped or logged out of their homes in Washington, so we conclude it was a Marten.

Early evening we are caught by Knock-Out, who is also racing for the Post Office. I give him my drivers licence in case he makes it and we don’t. At 7pm we crest Red’s Pass and quickly descend into an alpine bowl to make camp after 26 miles.

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Marten!

Marten!

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Reunited with knockout

Reunited with knockout

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A wet campsite, but we were ready to call it a day

A wet campsite, but we were ready to call it a day

Aug 28 – 24 miles (LORAX)

I awake at 5:30am as usual and pack up while water boils for coffee. We need to cover 26 miles today and tomorrow, plus another 7 the next day before the 9am bus to make it into Stehekin in time for the Post Office.

Today is gorgeous but tough, as we traverse around the awesome Glacier Peak. The section feels like the crux of the PCT with tough climbs, brushy trail and a rainy forecast. In the alpine hoary marmots are everywhere and their shrill whistles in concert with the squeaky bark of the Pika become the soundtrack to our day.

By mid afternoon we descend 3000′ to cross Milk Creek. Nearing the bottom, I spot an old trail that crosses the creek higher up. I convince T-Fox to give the seemingly shorter route a try, so we bushwhack through Devil’s Club towards the crossing. After 200 yards the trail disappears at a washout/landslide, so I use a sapling trunk to rappel 15 feet down the loose dirt wall to the creek. T-Fox is less impressed but eventually we get her down. The bridge here is long gone, so we spend 20 minutes scouting a crossing of the milky glacier creek. We climb up to where the creek is braided into thirds and make a reasonably easy crossing. Soon after we rejoin the PCT, having spent an hour to “save” what we later learn was 1.1 miles.

By 7pm we’ve climbed out of the valley and covered 24 miles. Exhausted, we set up camp on a sub-alpine ridge. We’re a bit disappointed to have the miles math tipped against us by the tough terrain. There’s 35 miles left to town and we have to catch the 9am bus the day after tomorrow or be stuck in Stehekin for 3 days.

Super foggy morning...

Super foggy morning…

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Glacier on Glacier Peak

Glacier on Glacier Peak

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Afternoon coffee

Afternoon coffee

T-Fox, a little shaken up by the river ford

T-Fox, a little shaken up by the river ford

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Aug 29 – 23 miles (LORAX)

Today we get on trail a few minutes early at 6:20 am. The alpine vegetation is wet as usual after a cold night. We descend towards the Suiattle River as the old growth trees increase in size. Soon we’re in a forest of huge Western Hemlock, Red Cedar and Douglas Fir. We scramble over a fallen and shattered red cedar that fills the air with its unique fragrance.

It feels like we’re making good time, but the map says we’ve only covered 4.5 miles by 8:30 am. We’ve already decided to take the old PCT route across the river. It’s 5 miles shorter than the new PCT which was re-routed in 2011 after the upper bridge washed out. We’ve already factored these mile savings into our math, so the brushy older route feels more like a set back as we struggle with two difficult creek crossings and many fallen logs.

Light rain starts as we begin the ascent out of the deep Suiattle drainage. We break at 4pm at the pass but chill quickly as rain starts to fall. We resume waking and try to hurry as we are far behind on miles, but the talus fields, scree bowls and overgrown avalanche chutes all dictate a slow speed. Finally we reach Agnes Creek at the valley bottom at 7:30pm. There’s a campsite here but it’s closed due to hazard trees so we press on. Darkness falls quickly as we hike and search for a site. Tired, we finally camp on a blanket of ferns after 23 tough miles.

As our sharp cheddar Annie’s Mac ‘n Cheese cooks, we discuss options for tomorrow. Our slow progress has left 12 miles between us and the 9am Stehekin bus. I offer to start early at 4 am and hike it solo, but T-Fox doesn’t want to be left behind. We consider missing the bus and hoping the Post Office will give our package to Knock-Out who has my ID and is ahead. Eventually we decide we’ll both hike out early, which means a 3:30am start as T-Fox’s top speed is a bit slower. With the alarm set for 2:30 am, we fall asleep on a lumpy bed of ferns.

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Drizzling day...

Drizzling day…

Log crossing on the old PCT

Log crossing on the old PCT

Douglas Fir

Douglas Fir

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Aug 30 – 12 miles (T-FOX)

Lorax’s alarm goes off at 2:30 a.m. and he quietly and slowly stirs, going about his morning duties. I lay in my down sleeping bag, dreading the moment when he gently reminds me that I need to get up too. What an ungodly hour to get up!

Hiking in the dark proves to be nauseating for both of us. We ate cereal, and feel that we may have shocked our bellies. I find myself feeling almost car sick as we hike in the pitch dark, with nothing but “tunnel vision” from our head lamps. All the plants and trees pass so quickly…I feel dizzy…

We manage to hike the entire 12 miles to the bus pick-up by 8 a.m! 12 miles already?! Why were we so slow all those other days lately? I guess it’s “going-to-town-syndrome.”

We wait for the 9 a.m. bus to arrive, along with some other hikers – Knockout, Pillsbury, Jukebox, and Ian. Upon arriving to Stehekin bakery, we are in heaven. This bakery is LEGENDARY…a PCT-thru hiker dream come true. Lorax grabs a coffee and giant sticky bun and heads back on the bus to sort out our camping and to hit the post office. I lounge around the bakery with other hikers, feeling the stoke to finally have made it here! We guzzle coffee, eat more sweets than should be legal, and reminisce about our hike. Everyone seems shocked to even be here…so close to the end…we try to put how that feels into words, but it’s so dang hard.

The rest of the day is pure bliss. I love Stehekin! What a great final town before the end of this whole hike.

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August 31 – zero miles (T-FOX)

We take the entire day off in Stehekin…something we rarely did in towns along this journey. It feels glorious to sleep in, spend the entire morning at the bakery (sticky buns AGAIN), and nap in the tent after lunch. Normally these things would make me feel so lazy…but we deserve it! We had to book it to town to be at the post office, and our bodies need the rest.

Lorax and I walk around town, holding hands, trying to make sense of this crazy adventurous whirlwind. How can time fly by so fast, yet our start date of April 18th feel so so so long ago…? And we’ve walked every single step of the way! We didn’t get stuck by Forest fires! We have been so fortunate, not only to have this opportunity, but to have everything go so smoothly. Knock on wood T-Fox…this ain’t over yet!

We say goodbye to several hikers that we won’t be seeing agin – knockout, Freckles, Jawbone and Liverpool. They’re heading back to the trail earlier than us, so they’ll beat us to Canada. It’s sort do sad how this is all wrapping up. Our traveling band of hikers is spreading out…it’s surreal.

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